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Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Texas Firefighter/Fire Marshal On-Duty Death






Firefighter/Fire Marshal Matt Waller, 47, of the Memphis Fire Department, Memphis, Texas on February 25, 2012, at 13:30 hrs., passed away from a stroke he suffered while on-duty at the fire station.

Matt has worked for the Memphis Fire Department, for 29 years and has been the Fire Marshal for the Memphis, Texas the last 15 years.

Our condolences to the Waller Family & Friends, the Memphis Fire Department, and to all affected by the Firefighter/Fire Marshal Matt Waller's passing.


To date, 13 firefighter fatalities have been reported to USFA in 2012. Year-to-date USFA firefighter fatality reports are posted online at U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) Fatality Notices page.


(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

Monday, February 27, 2012

Unattended cooking remains one of the leading cause of U.S. home fires


Leaving an unattended pan or skillet cooking on the stove is a good way to burn your food, not to mention the chance of burning down your house.

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) cooking fires are the #1 cause of home* fires and home fire injuries. Two-thirds (66%) of home cooking fire started with the ignition of food or other cooking materials. Further more according to U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) statistics, almost 30 percent of all reported home fires start in the kitchen, and of those, most involve the range-top.

Basic cooking fire prevention and fire safety mesures are very simple and easy to do and can prevent a cooking situation from becoming a far worse outcome. Just remember, practice and use these Cooking Fire Safety Tips ...

* Always use cooking equipment tested and approved by a recognized testing facility.

* Never leave cooking food on the stovetop unattended, and keep a close eye on food cooking inside the oven.

* Keep cooking areas clean and clear of combustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging).

* Keep children and pets away from cooking areas by creating a three-foot (one-meter) "kid–free zone" around the stove.

* Turn pot handles inward so they can't be bumped and children can't grab them.

* Wear short, close fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and catch fire.

* Never use a wet oven mitt, as it presents a scald danger if the moisture in the mitt is heated.

* Always keep a potholder, oven mitt and lid handy. If a small grease fire starts in a pan, put on an oven mitt and smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner.

* Never pour water on a grease fire and never discharge a fire extinguisher onto a pan fire, as it can spray or shoot burning grease around the kitchen, actually spreading the fire.

* If there is an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed to prevent flames from burning you and your clothing.

* There is a microwave fire, keep the door closed and unplug the microwave. Call the fire department and make sure to have the oven serviced before you use it again.

* Food cooked in a microwave can be dangerously hot. Remove the lids or other coverings from microwaved food carefully to prevent steam burns.

Fire can ripped through a home after a unattended cooking fire gets started. Such was the case in Lehigh Acres, Florida when the Lehigh Acres Fire Rescue responded to combat a structure fire at 2706 13th Street SW at 1325 hours on 2/24/12. The cause of the fire was unattended cooking. The family told firefighters that around 1:30 p.m., they left their home after cooking and forgot to turn the stove off. Here's news footage of this fire and video footage of the firefighters fighting the blaze...



Remember, Prevent Fires! It's Your Job!



(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)


Friday, February 24, 2012

NFPA partners with LEGOLAND® Florida for fire safety education


Partnership will spread important safety messages for kids and families

(NFPA NEWS RELEASE) – Streamers flew and smoke alarms beeped as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) kicked off its long-term partnership with LEGOLAND® Florida to provide lifesaving information to families and kids during a press event and special fire safety day at central Florida’s newest theme park today.

“The majority of fire deaths happen in homes where there are no working smoke alarms,” said NFPA President Jim Shannon. “We are excited to join with LEGOLAND Florida to impart two extremely important messages - test your smoke alarms and have an escape plan.”

NFPA will sponsor the park’s fire safety - themed “The Big Test” live show at the LEGO® City Stage where these messages will be incorporated. “The Big Test” is an acrobatic, comedy show in which a cast of characters goes through a series of hysterical antics as they try to become firefighters. There will also be special activities throughout the year that stress the importance of fire safety and acknowledge the critical work of the fire service.

Video: See a preview of "The Big Test".


During the kick-off event, hundreds of kids and families tested smoke alarms, learned ways to stay safe and posed for pictures with area firefighters in full gear before sitting down to watch the highly acclaimed “The Big Test”.

“This partnership allows us to combine kids’ love of the fire service and LEGOLAND to build life-saving knowledge,” said Adrian Jones, LEGOLAND Florida general manager. “We are proud to play this important role for our community.”

About LEGOLAND Florida
LEGOLAND Florida opened on October 15, 2011 and is a 150-acre interactive theme park dedicated to families with children between the ages of 2 and 12. Located midway between Orlando and Tampa, just 45 minutes from either city center, the park features more than 50 rides, shows and attractions. There are currently four other LEGOLAND Parks in the world – LEGOLAND California in Carlsbad, LEGOLAND Billund in Denmark, LEGOLAND Deutschland near G├╝nzburg, Germany and LEGOLAND Windsor outside of London. The LEGOLAND theme parks are a part of Merlin Entertainments Group, the second largest attractions operator in the world.

About the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
NFPA is a worldwide leader in fire, electrical, building, and life safety. The mission of the international nonprofit organization founded in 1896 is to reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life by providing and advocating consensus codes and standards, research, training, and education. For more information on this partnership, please visit www.nfpa.org/legoland.



(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)


Oil tank explosion on Pelican Island near Port of Galveston

Crude oil tank explodes and burns and shaking Texas island city of Galveston











Published Thursday, February 23, 2012

(KHOU) —A fuel tank burned Thusday evrening after an explosion near the Port of Galveston, City of Galveston spokeswoman Alicia Cahill said.

It all began around 7 p.m. with a loud explosion that could be heard three miles away from a property owned by Texas International Terminals. Thirty-five firefighters from the Galveston Fire Department responded to the three-alarm fire in the 4900 block of Old Port Industrial Road.



(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)



Thursday, February 23, 2012

McCutchanville VFD Firefighter In Fatal Overturned Apparatus Crash

































Firefighter/EMT Jeremy Tighe, 18, of McCutchanville VFD, Evansville, Indiana, on February 22, 2012, died of fatal injuries he sustained last evening. The tragic incident occurred after the engine company apparatus Jeremy was riding in, as a passenger, was involved in a single apparatus accident that overturned and crash violently, striking a utility pole while traveling north on St. Joseph Avenue.

24 year-old Brandon Cason of Evansville VFD, the driver of the vehicle, was taken to Deaconess Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. It has been reported he has since been released.

The engine company vehicle 18-year-old firefighter Tighe was riding in was returning from a emergency response for a reported carbon monoxide activation. The fire engine rige was reported available for service after thie CO2 response call at 8:10 p.m., the fire apparatus accident happen at 8:30 p.m..

McCuthanville Fire Department PIO Lt. Steve Gibson said "They were returning from a run when for some unknown reason their truck went off the side of the pavement."

Our condolences to all affected by this tragedy.

To date, 12 firefighter fatalities have been reported to USFA in 2012. Year-to-date USFA firefighter fatality reports are posted online at U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) Fatality Notices page.




(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)







3-Alarm Fire in East Orange, NJ 02.21.12
















A full 3-Alarm response was sent when fire broke out around 12:30 a.m. Tuesday (21 Feb) at 301 South Burnett Street in East Orange, NJ. It was reported by responding firefighting crews heavy smoke and fire visible blokes away from the fireground scene.

Heavy fire had possession of the second floor and was extending upward in a large 2 ½ story frame dwelling. Intense heat from the fire also melted away the siding on the adjacent homes. Attack lines were put into place and an exposure line was put into operation. Several failed attempts to enter and fighting fire on the second floor were made to where it was decided to go into a defencive firefighting operation.

The 3-family home was destroyed by the consuming large fire, but no one was hurt or injured.
















Investigation into what ignited the fire is on going.

Here's video footage provided by Ed Gray, allhandsgoingtowork on YouTube, of the fire ground operations...









(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)





Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Four Killed In Fast-Moving Rochester Multi-Family House Fire 2.18.12

Firefighters originally were called for a rubbish fire on the sidewalk.

















Rochester Fire Department officials work at the scene of a fire in Rochester, N.Y. on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2012. A fast-moving fire swept through the multifamily home early Saturday, killing four people, all of whom appeared to be children or teenagers, fire officials said. (AP Photo/Democrat & Chronicle, Kris J. Murante)



Published Sunday, February 19, 2012

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Investigators are trying to determine what caused a fast-moving fire that swept through a multifamily home early Saturday, killing four people, all of whom appeared to be children or teenagers, fire officials said.

Firefighters were on the scene quickly and tried to reach people sleeping inside, but the blaze spread through the two-story wood-framed building with such speed they were unable to get to people trapped on the upper floor.

"The firefighters were actually enveloped in flames for a brief time," Rochester fire Chief John Caufield told the Democrat and Chronicle newspaper. "We withdrew them. There was just no possible way for them to make a search or any further entry in there without really sacrificing their own lives."

Authorities have not yet released the identities and ages of the victims.

Caufield said five people survived the blaze. A woman and her toddler were rescued by firefighters on the first floor and three others in the house escaped by jumping from a second-floor window. They were taken to a hospital, he said.

The cause of the fire was under investigation, but the circumstances appeared unusual.

Firefighters were called to the neighborhood at 1 a.m. to extinguish a rubbish fire on the sidewalk. After dousing those flames, in what looked like a pile of burning clothes, firefighters did a routine canvass of the wood-frame apartment building on the property, Caufield said, and discovered another fire "that appeared to have occurred while we were here."

The fire crew radioed for help and rushed inside the dwelling, but things sped out of control.

"The whole first floor was heavily involved with fire," Caufield said. "The initial crew that was here made entry into the building and rescued a woman and an infant from the first-floor apartment. And in the short time it took to make that rescue, the fire flashed over and took over the whole first floor and extended quickly to the second floor."

Fire officials could see people moving on the second floor of the building, but within minutes flames were shooting from the windows.

Rochester Mayor Thomas Richards praised the bravery of the firefighters.

"The men and women of the Rochester Fire Department saved the life of a mother and her young toddler who were downstairs, then tried repeatedly to save the other four children upstairs," Richards said in a statement sent to the Democrat and Chronicle.

"They risked their lives in the attempt and had to be ordered back when the fire flashed and engulfed the house," Richards said.

Grape Street Fire: The Rochester fire chief on Feb. 18 describes the events that led to the deaths of four children.
The Rochester Fire Department on Monday identified the four children killed in a fire on Grape Street on Saturday.

The siblings were identified as Gage Reavey, 14, Greg Kugler, 13, Kandee Kugler, 12, and Kaiden Kugler, 6.

The children's mother, Bobbie Kugler, 30, and her 2-year-old son, Tyron Jackson, were rescued from the first-floor of the residence at 82 Grape St., firefighters said.
Family friend James Austin, 25, and two teens — Waltquaries Evans, 15, and Giovanni Delorm, 13 — jumped from second-floor windows to escape the blaze. Austin, a friend of Bobbie Kugler's, also lived at 82 Grape. The two teens were sleeping over when the fire broke out, firefighters said.

All five were taken to Strong Memorial Hospital on Saturday. Delorm was in guarded condition on Monday; Austin, Evans and Tyron were in satisfactory condition, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Bobbie Kugler's status was not available.




(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)


Monday, February 13, 2012

Virginia Firefighter LODD, Died After Tanker Apparatus Crashes
































(This photo of Zach Whitacre is from his Facebook Profile)



Frederick County Fire and Rescue Officials informed during an afternoon press conference that 21-year-old Zachary Whitacre, a member of the Gore Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department , died after being taken to Winchester Medical Center.

Firefighter Whitacre died early this Monday morning in a single vehicle accident crash just over the West Virgina line for a mutual response for wate at around 4am this morningr. The tanker involved in the accident was heading to Capon Bridge to pick up water before responding to a reported structure fire in Hampshire County.

It was reported that Zachary Whitacre, who was riding in the back of a 1986 Ford fire tanker, was thrown out of the tanker and died afer the vehicle lost control on an icy Route 50, sending it into an embankment.

Donald Whitacre the driver of the tanker, and also Zachary's father, was taken to the hospital for non life-threatening injuries.

Fire Chief Linaburg described the tragity as one of the saddest moments in Frederick County's history.

The Gore Volunteer Fire & Rescue Department is one of eleven stations within the Frederick County Fire & Rescue Department. Gore is located about 10 miles from Winchester near the Virginia/West Virginia State Line.

Thoughts and prayers go out to Zach Whitacre’s Family, the Gore Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department, Frederick County Fire & Rescue Department, and Zach’s Friends.


To date, 11 firefighter fatalities have been reported to USFA in 2012. Year-to-date monthly and annual USFA firefighter fatality reports are posted online at



(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

Frozen Hydrants No Friend To Firefighters
















Frustrated by frozen hydrants, Milwaukee firefighters battled a blaze Saturday afternoon on the south side, but got no help from Mother Nature. Just after 4 p.m. , firefighting crews responded to the scene of a two-story structure fire in the 2200 block of S. Muskego Ave.. The first three fire hydrants fire crews tried to connect to were found to be frozen. After connecting to a fourth hydrant, which worked properly, provided the needed water to combat the third floor attic wood-framed duplex fire inside the building and eventually extinguish the fire.

“That’s unusual. We normally don’t run into that, but we did and our folks did a nice job overcoming that,” Deputy Chief Jack Christianson with the Milwaukee Fire Department said at the scene.

"It took a little longer to put it out and the fire gained a little," Battalion Chief Joe Robak said said, "It does happen. It's hit and miss. It's hard to tell when one will freeze."

The home in home on Milwaukee’s south side was destroyed and the cause of the fire remains under investigation,

YouTube videos from Nemmy25 showing on the progression of a fire on Saturday Feb 11, 2012 in the 2200 block of S. Muskego Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin...








(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

Friday, February 10, 2012

Audioboo: Winter Fire Safety PSA




















(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Arlington VA Paramedic Joshua Weissman LODD















Official statement from the City of Alexandria:

It is with great sadness that Alexandria Fire Chief Adam K. Thiel announced the death of Paramedic Joshua Weissman at 4:25pm on Thursday, February 9.

While responding to a car fire on Interstate 395 near Glebe Road on the evening of February 8, Paramedic Weissman fell from the roadway, where he suffered a severe head injury. He was rescued by City of Alexandria and Arlington County Firefighters and Paramedics, with assistance from the City of Alexandria and Arlington County Police Departments and the Virginia State Police. Despite valiant efforts by the medical team at the Washington Hospital Center, Paramedic Weissman’s injuries proved to be fatal.

Joshua Weissman, 33, of Bristow, VA. was a seven-year veteran of the Alexandria Fire Department, and was hired in April 2006.








Alexandria First Responder Critically Injured on I-395: MyFoxDC.com

Joshua Weissman, Alexandria Fire Dept Paramedic, Dies After Fall From I-395 Overpass Into Four Mile Run Creek

http://wusa9.com/news/article/189631/44/Paramedic-Dies-After-Fall-From-Overpass




(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

Electrical fire safety tips...


















It is urged and advised for people to take care when using electrical equipment in the home and at work.

It is as easy as one following a set of golden rules such as switching off and unplugging appliances when not in use, keeping heaters away from furniture and curtains with at least a 3 foot space inbetween any combustable material, and not overloading sockets. Electrical fires in the home and at work can be devastating but are always preventable. It is really important people check their electrics are in good working order.

According to the United States Fire Administration (USFA) electrical fires in our homes claim the lives of of 280 Americans each year. Many of these fires are caused by incorrectly installed wiring and overloaded circuits and extension cords.

Winter fires can be prevented! The following electrical fire safety tips can help you maintain a fire-safe home this winter season.

  • Routinely check your electrical appliances and wiring.
  • Frayed wires can cause fires. Replace all worn, old or damaged appliance cords immediately.
  • Replace any electrical tool if it causes even small electrical shocks, overheats, shorts out, or gives off smoke or sparks.
  • Keep electrical appliances away from wet floors and counters; pay special care to electrical appliances in the bathroom and kitchen.
  • Buy electrical products evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, like UL.
  • Keep clothes, curtains, and other potentially combustible items at least three feet from all heaters.
  • If an appliance has a three-prong plug, use it only in a three-slot outlet. Never force it to fit into a two-slot outlet or extension cord.
  • Don't allow children to play with or around electrical appliances like space heaters, irons, and hair dryers.
  • Use safety closures to "child-proof" electrical outlets.
  • Use electrical extension cords wisely; never overload extension cords or wall sockets.
  • Immediately shut off, then professionally replace, light switches that are hot to the touch and lights that flicker.
Teaching children about fire safety is very important. Here's certified firefighter Gabriel Williams with some electrical safety tips for kids in the following video clip. . .


Everyone needs to know that there are simple steps you can take to prevent the loss of life and property resulting from electrical fires.

For more information on electrical fire safety, visit the U.S. Fire Administration's website.

The United States Fire Administration recommends everyone should have a comprehensive fire protection plan that includes smoke alarms, residential sprinklers, and practicing a home fire escape plan.


(The usual disclaimers: I am not a journalist; This is a blog that expresses an outlook and is not conclusive in any shape or manner.)

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